Tech Task # 7 – Mobile Learning

I really enjoyed Liz Kolb’s presentation on Mobile learning. She introduced us to a whole new range of fabulous resources that can be used to make learning fun for students, using their mobile devices. I had never even thought before that mobile could also be used in classroom to enhance learning, but after listening to Liz my outlook has drastically changed.

There is whole list of resources and ideas, introduced to us by Liz, but today I will particularly discuss two that stood out for me: Remind101 and QR Codes

Remind101 is not something new to me. I have been a part of this service as our professor for ECMP355 class uses this service to communicate with us. I  find this service really easy to use, and with lots of potential for a teacher. By asking students to sign in it becomes really easy on the part of teachers to remind students about their homework, assignments or other important events on their cell phones. Teachers can even ask parents to sign in so that teachers can maintain a direct contact with them updating them about the child’s whereabouts regularly. This way you don’t have to depend on students to serve as a communication bridge.

Another idea that really fascinated me is the use of QR Codes in the classroom. Being a science teacher, I can see the potential of using them in my subject area. By using QR codes we give student fast access to target activities, which saves a lot of time as students don’t wander around web to search for resources.

Some ways to engage students in science using QR codes are as follows:

Teachers can create Scavenger Hunt Game, which would  involve students to run around a school garden (or any place) in search of the pre-designed QR codes (based on plants or animals) hidden by the teacher. When students find a QR code, they would scan it with a mobile device to reveal a question which they will have to answer and discuss with other students and the teacher. It can be a used by teachers to review or gauge what students have learned in the class and to introduce something new in a fun way. I feel it will help the students to come out of their dull and boring class lecture into the lap of nature to learn in a fun way. This gamification of the lesson will not only engage them, but also motivate them to share their knowledge.

Carolyn Durley, a biology teacher, shared a link with me the other day. It is a post written by a teacher  explaining how she has  incorporated QR code in science lessons in order to review what the students have learned.

Here is the QR Code for the post
qrcode

Teachers can turn the entire periodic table in QR code format, where each QR Code links to a video of that particular element. When students scan a code it will directly lead them to the video of that element, enabling them to learn all about it.

Here is a link to the The Periodic Table of Video (available of Flicker)

Qr codes can also be used to help students learn the scientific and common name for plants and trees in the school garden. Teacher can make codes with the scientific name and common name of different plants and attach them to  stakes near the plants. This will ignite the curiosity among the students to scan and know all about the particular plant.

Teachers can also create a website that contains detail information about the plants and link it with the QR Codes so that students can learn more about the particular plant, apart from their names.

Here is a Dropbox File that was shared with me by Stacey Wallwin, on using QR codes in classroom. Make sure to check it out –
qrcode

There can be so many ways to use QR code, not only in science, but in any subject area making learning fun and engaging. I am still working on my creativity to work on ideas of incorporating them in different areas. May be I would write a new post discussing them all in detail.

So far I have had a chance to look into these two tools in particular. Looking forward to explore all the resources discussed by Liz and use them in my classroom successfully.

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